Critical Election in a Crisis

We are facing a triple crisis: COVID, the wildfires, and threats to our democracy – all of which expose Oakland's enormous economic and racial disparities in health, housing, public safety, education, and jobs. Communities of color, low-income workers, and local businesses struggle to survive, and inequity is crippling our entire city. Oakland Rising Action is working to elect leaders who will drive bold, progressive change to weather this crisis and emerge as a city that champions our shared values of racial, economic, and environmental justice.

We Support Elected Leaders Who:

  • Fight for bold, progressive systemic change
  • Prioritize economic, racial, and environmental justice
  • Possess a clear racial analysis and understand the roots of systemic oppression
  • Center low-income folks, people of color, immigrants, incarcerated and other disenfranchised communities
  • Champion a community-investment budget, particularly for the COVID crisis and recovery
  • Advocate for just development, tenants, long-term residents, workers, and the homeless
  • Bring a community-driven perspective on safety, focused on prevention and police accountability
  • Take an organizing approach to politics with strong roots in flatlands neighborhoods

Endorsements Driven by Grassroots Leaders & Our Values

Oakland Rising Action's endorsement process is community-led. Working-class, immigrant, and people of color leaders; Flatlands voters; Oakland natives; and progressive policy experts identify candidates who most align with our values, vision, and strategy for our city. We then get out the vote in Oakland’s disenfranchised communities through education, mobilization and turnout. Fundamentally, we are shifting power to make Oakland a city that champions equity and centers residents most impacted by systemic racism, poverty, environmental hazards, policing, and mass incarceration.

Oakland City Council Endorsements

Dan is a steadfast leader who has proven his commitment to environmental stewardship, affordable housing for all, and evidence-based policymaking throughout his tenure as councilmember. Dan has led key initiatives for working families in Oakland, including:

  • Banning the storage and moving of coal through the Port of Oakland
  • Developing the Tenant Protection Ordinance of 2014
  • Authoring the charter ballot measure to create the Civilian Police Commission
  • Securing millions of dollars for affordable housing

Dan has worked successfully with a range of community groups including East Bay Housing Organization, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Environmental Climate Action Plan. As the effects of climate change are making our lives more challenging, the need for clean energy becomes more urgent. Oaklanders need Dan’s track record, networks, and scientific approach to help Oakland stay resilient and healthy. 

Dan’s opponents for the District 1 seat do not have the leadership experience or commitment to the community or the environment that he has. Dan is widely recognized for being one of the most effective policymakers in Oakland, and we look forward to seeing his vision of resolving the housing crisis, protecting the environment, and strengthening our public schools happen. Because when Dan commits to something, he gets it done.

Carroll is the definition of an unapologetic, bold, proactive and values-driven leader. She brings a track record of working for - and winning - progressive policies rooted in racial justice and self-determination.

Carroll has a track record of working across coalitions to:

  • Pass California’s strongest city-level eviction moratorium for renters, small businesses, and nonprofits
  • Prevent the rezoning of the Oakland Coliseum to save 8,000 jobs
  • Create the Department of Race and Equity at the City of Oakland
  • Develop Oakland’s groundbreaking cannabis equity program

District 3 desperately needs Carroll’s leadership to overcome years of questionable decision making under Lynnette Gibson McElhaney, who puts profits before people. McElhaney has invited market rate development, fueling the displacement of Black and low-income residents. She has consistently voted against Oakland’s workers: opposing minimum wage increases, raises for city workers, and fair contracts with union labor. And she has violated city ethics rules for moving policies for personal financial gain.

By contrast, Carroll walks the talk. She led the Moms4Housing movement that changed the city, country, and world’s conversations around affordable housing. She serves as the executive director of ACCE and leads the ReFund Oakland Coalition, developing countless policies to improve the lives of Oaklanders.

And most importantly, Carroll has a vision for an equitable Oakland. Her platform to advance a Black New Deal, divest from policing, and meet the housing crisis head-on is the vision our community needs. We can’t wait to see it happen.

Richard is a real values-driven leader. Bringing a fresh perspective, he partners with the community to create systemic solutions to Oakland’s challenges. We are excited to see his innovative vision for the city, which includes commitment to:

  • Participatory budgeting so the people get a say in the city budget
  • The Black New Deal to reinvigorate the local economy while promoting racial justice
  • Defunding police and reinvesting in community, education, and job-training services
  • Empowering Oakland teachers through just wages and investing in public schools
  • Developing a cultural corridor to highlight Oakland’s vibrant cultural history

Richard has a track record of working with local community organizations dedicated to improving the lives of working families such as Communities United for Restorative Youth justice (CURYJ), the Sunshine Movement, and Centro Legal de la Raza.

Meanwhile, Richard’s opponent and current seat holder, Noel Gallo, has proven himself to be weak when it comes to responding to making systemic changes.  Gallo is full of contradictions – he often sides with renter protections, but has referred to unhoused residents in his district as being filthy and drug users. He doesn’t see the connection between shifting city resources away from policing and toward increased services and programs in his district.

We need a councilmember who will stay true to the progressive values of this city. Vote for Richard.

Treva is a single Black mom and has a firm commitment to the East Oakland community. We hope to see her grow into a champion of systemic change for racial and environmental justice. Treva has government experience and is an advocate for ending gun violence, investing in affordable housing, and creating good jobs.

As a former Oakland Rising’s Value Based Leadership Program participant, Treva is set to create a relationship with residents and community organizations that differs from the antagonistic ones held by her father, who has held the seat for the last 23 years. Together, we hope we can rebuild the table where power resides by bringing a collective voice of those most marginalized in politics by engaging and organizing the residents of District 7.

We are curious about Treva’s recent role as a senior public affairs and government relations representative for PG&E for the past five years during the wildfires and her stance towards development (she’s for it). At Oakland Rising Action we know that we can’t develop our way out of the housing crisis.

But Treva’s values of equity and inclusion are there. Once elected, let’s hold her accountable to ensure that she continues to make decisions with the community benefit in mind.

Rebecca Kaplan is a proven advocate for racial and economic justice, and has shown considerable growth as a council member for the past eleven years. Her wide array of initiatives to improve quality of life, jobs, and safety throughout the city speak to her values of equity and justice. Rebecca has an impressive track record of progressive policy wins in Oakland, such as:

  • Fighting for the strongest and most independent police oversight commission possible.
  • Authoring Measure JJ, which voters passed in 2016 to protect renters from excessive rent increases and wrongful evictions.
  • Improving air quality for local communities by representing Oakland on the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Board and obtaining millions of dollars for vital Oakland projects
  • Protecting publicly-owned land for the public good.

Rebecca’s opponent, Derrek Johnson, could not be further from Rebecca’s values-driven approach. Johnson has opposed commonsense policies such as paid sick days for Oakland workers. He has received substantial donations from big business interests, including real estate developers who have been driving Oakland’s affordable housing crisis. A vote for Johnson is a vote for profits over people.

In the wake of a pandemic and climate disaster, we cannot afford to lose Rebecca’s leadership. She is the candidate who is open to accountability, sticks with the community and puts working families first. Let’s vote for a leader who we can trust.

Dan is a steadfast leader who has proven his commitment to environmental stewardship, affordable housing for all, and evidence-based policymaking throughout his tenure as councilmember. Dan has led key initiatives for working families in Oakland, including:

  • Banning the storage and moving of coal through the Port of Oakland
  • Developing the Tenant Protection Ordinance of 2014
  • Authoring the charter ballot measure to create the Civilian Police Commission
  • Securing millions of dollars for affordable housing

Dan has worked successfully with a range of community groups including East Bay Housing Organization, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Environmental Climate Action Plan. As the effects of climate change are making our lives more challenging, the need for clean energy becomes more urgent. Oaklanders need Dan’s track record, networks, and scientific approach to help Oakland stay resilient and healthy. 

Dan’s opponents for the District 1 seat do not have the leadership experience or commitment to the community or the environment that he has. Dan is widely recognized for being one of the most effective policymakers in Oakland, and we look forward to seeing his vision of resolving the housing crisis, protecting the environment, and strengthening our public schools happen. Because when Dan commits to something, he gets it done.

Carroll is the definition of an unapologetic, bold, proactive and values-driven leader. She brings a track record of working for - and winning - progressive policies rooted in racial justice and self-determination.

Carroll has a track record of working across coalitions to:

  • Pass California’s strongest city-level eviction moratorium for renters, small businesses, and nonprofits
  • Prevent the rezoning of the Oakland Coliseum to save 8,000 jobs
  • Create the Department of Race and Equity at the City of Oakland
  • Develop Oakland’s groundbreaking cannabis equity program

District 3 desperately needs Carroll’s leadership to overcome years of questionable decision making under Lynnette Gibson McElhaney, who puts profits before people. McElhaney has invited market rate development, fueling the displacement of Black and low-income residents. She has consistently voted against Oakland’s workers: opposing minimum wage increases, raises for city workers, and fair contracts with union labor. And she has violated city ethics rules for moving policies for personal financial gain.

By contrast, Carroll walks the talk. She led the Moms4Housing movement that changed the city, country, and world’s conversations around affordable housing. She serves as the executive director of ACCE and leads the ReFund Oakland Coalition, developing countless policies to improve the lives of Oaklanders.

And most importantly, Carroll has a vision for an equitable Oakland. Her platform to advance a Black New Deal, divest from policing, and meet the housing crisis head-on is the vision our community needs. We can’t wait to see it happen.

Richard is a real values-driven leader. Bringing a fresh perspective, he partners with the community to create systemic solutions to Oakland’s challenges. We are excited to see his innovative vision for the city, which includes commitment to:

  • Participatory budgeting so the people get a say in the city budget
  • The Black New Deal to reinvigorate the local economy while promoting racial justice
  • Defunding police and reinvesting in community, education, and job-training services
  • Empowering Oakland teachers through just wages and investments in public schools
  • Developing a cultural corridor to highlight Oakland’s vibrant cultural history

Richard has a track record of working with local community organizations dedicated to improving the lives of working families such as Communities United for Restorative Youth justice (CURYJ), the Sunshine Movement, and Centro Legal de la Raza.

Meanwhile, Richard’s opponent and current seat holder, Noel Gallo, has proven himself to be weak when it comes to responding to making systemic changes.  Gallo is full of contradictions – he often sides with renter protections, but has referred to unhoused residents in his district as being filthy and drug users. He doesn’t see the connection between shifting city resources away from policing and toward increased services and programs in his district.

We need a councilmember who will stay true to the progressive values of this city. Vote for Richard.

Treva is a single Black mom and has a firm commitment to the Oakland community. We hope to see her grow into a champion of systemic change for racial and environmental justice. Treva has government experience and is an advocate for ending gun violence, investing in affordable housing, and creating good jobs.

As a former Oakland Rising’s Value Based Leadership Program participant, Treva is set to create a relationship with residents and community organizations that differs from the antagonistic ones held by her father, who has held the seat for the last 23 years. Together, we hope we can rebuild the table where power resides by bringing a collective voice of those most marginalized in politics by engaging and organizing the residents of District 7. 

We are curious about Treva’s recent role as a senior public affairs and government relations representative for PG&E for the past five years during the wildfires and her stance towards development (she’s for it). At Oakland Rising Action we know that we can’t develop our way out of the housing crisis. 

But Treva’s values of equity and inclusion are there. Once elected, let’s hold her accountable to ensure that she continues to make decisions with the community benefit in mind.

Rebecca Kaplan is a strong advocate for the community and has shown considerable growth as a council member for the past eleven years. Her wide array of initiatives to improve quality of life, jobs, and safety throughout the city speak to her values of equity and justice. Rebecca has an impressive track record of progressive policy wins in Oakland, such as:

  • Fighting for the strongest and most independent police oversight commission possible.
  • Authoring Measure JJ, which voters passed in 2016 to protect renters from excessive rent increases and wrongful evictions.
  • Improving air quality for local communities by representing Oakland on the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Board and obtaining millions of dollars for vital Oakland projects
  • Protecting publicly-owned land for the public good.

Rebecca’s opponent, Derrek Johnson, could not be further from Rebecca’s values-driven approach. Johnson has opposed commonsense policies such as paid sick days for Oakland workers. He has received substantial donations from big business interests, including real estate developers who have been driving Oakland’s affordable housing crisis. A vote for Johnson is a vote for profits over people.

In the wake of a pandemic and climate disaster, we cannot afford to lose Rebecca’s leadership. She is the candidate who is open to accountability, sticks with the community and puts working families first. Let’s vote for a leader who we can trust.

School Board Endorsements

With schools shifting to remote learning, kids from low-income families are falling further behind. Low-income parents tend to work outside of the home in essential jobs like package delivery, food service, and grocery stores. They have the added cost of childcare and cannot be home during class time. Oakland’s school board cannot operate in a silo and must address how income inequality impacts education. With no incumbents running, we have the opportunity to elect a new board that will fight to level the education playing field, close the racial gap, and ensure all children receive a quality education. Our board must push the city and state for an equitable COVID response and recovery; create real budget accountability and transparency; fight corporate privatization; and have a deep belief in upholding public education.

There really is no big difference between the two candidates. They both support budget accountability, and oppose school closures, publicly-owned property sales, and charter school expansion. 

Stacy is a little more adamant about abolishing the presence of police in schools. She believes that there is no real place for police in schools; while Sam sees that there could be some need for emergency police support but believes there should be no ongoing police presence.

They both need a little more support on seeing the impact of privatization beyond the school system, its connection to gentrification, and how to address the impacts of gentrification within the schools.

Stacy is a bookkeeper by trade and wants to focus on how to use the budget as a moral compass and, after an audit, how to clearly address these priorities by focusing funding to school sites. She needs support navigating Board politics and using a community engagement model that includes organizing families. She believes that the sale of publicly-owned properties should be barred and that we should consider innovative ways to use the properties like housing, community centers, etc.

Sam has the support of community organizations including Faith In Action and OEA, the local teachers’ union. Although he believes that charter schools have a negative impact on public schools, he believes in a stick and carrot strategy to bring charter parents into the fold of public schools. He needs support in learning the connections between development and gentrification of our city with privatization of our public schools and imagining what public land for public good looks like.

1. Cherisse Gash

Cherisse is an Oakland parent and grew up in District 3 and has deep ties to the community. She has a strong vision and track record of leadership mobilizing parents around school closures. She understands how the privatization of schools has fueled racial injustice and pushed out Black and Brown families. She is deeply committed to keeping police out of Oakland schools, stemming the tide of charter school expansion in the district, and creating complete transparency with the school district’s budget to stop school closures.

 
2. VanCedric Williams

VanCedric has a long history of teaching and organizing in the Bay Area and is committed to budget transparency and racial justice in Oakland schools. He plans to re-establish trust between parents, teachers, and OUSD, strengthen literacy standards, incorporate ethnic studies into K-12, and build budget accountability mechanisms into the district’s budget process.

 

It’s true that VanCedric has less experience with Oakland schools than San Francisco’s. But VanCedric’s record shows that he is a leader who knows how to get things done. He has been an active member of unions and advocacy groups including United Educators of San Francisco (UESF), California Federation of Certificated and Classified Teachers (CFT), and the CFT’s Diversity Leadership Committee and Racial Justice Taskforce. If Cherisse and VanCedric win, we could have a progressive majority on the School Board.

 

Cherisse and VanCedric’s main opponent, Maiya Edgerly, has money coming in from the charters. We need leaders who are committed to the public school system, not corporate privatization. Ranked choice vote for Cherisse and VanCedric.

Mike is an educator and organizer who has a strong commitment to the school district and a clear vision for addressing the district’s most pressing challenges. Mike believes, and so do we, that our city needs to stop the privatization of our public schools and remove the harmful presence of police officers in the place where our children are learning and growing.


Mike’s platform includes putting a stop to school closures, a full audit of OUSD, and stopping the spread of charter schools throughout the city. Mike’s been endorsed by other leaders that we believe in – like Cat Brooks and Carroll Fife – and none of his opponents have as strong a sustained commitment to our city.

1. Kristina Molina

Kristina is a dedicated parent leader and advocate who has won improvements for Oakland schools and will do more if elected. Kristina is a parent of four children in Oakland public schools and an active member of Parent Voice Oakland. 

For over 20 years, she has worked to improve the lives of communities of color, women, elders, youth, immigrants, unsheltered, and LGBTQ+ individuals. For example, Kristina created caucuses with community members to reflect the diversity of District 7 and its needs, including a Black caucus, Latinx caucus, parents with special needs in schools, LGBTQ+ caucus, and more. 

If elected, Kristina would focus on ensuring clear accountability around the OUSD budget, beginning with an audit. In our opinion, no other candidate compares in terms of values, commitment, and track record. Vote for Kristina.

 

2. Victor Valerio

Victor is a proponent of public schools, and he believes we can make public schools more enticing to families by making them better.

Victor grew up in OUSD and has experience with OUSD Budget Oversight, and while we think some of his policy proposals could be stronger, we are impressed with his platform to improve public schools in Oakland, which includes closing the gap on inequity by supporting the most marginalized and at-risk youth, avoiding further school closures in East Oakland, and addressing the digital divide in Oakland schools.

There really is no big difference between the two candidates. They both support budget accountability, and oppose school closures, publicly-owned property sales, and charter school expansion. 

Stacy is a little more adamant about abolishing the presence of police in schools. She believes that there is no real place for police in schools; while Sam sees that there could be some need for emergency police support but believes there should be no ongoing police presence.

They both need a little more support on seeing the impact of privatization beyond the school system, its connection to gentrification, and how to address the impacts of gentrification within the schools.

Stacy is a bookkeeper by trade and wants to focus on how to use the budget as a moral compass and, after an audit, how to clearly address these priorities by focusing funding to school sites. She needs support navigating Board politics and using a community engagement model that includes organizing families. She believes that the sale of publicly-owned properties should be barred and that we should consider innovative ways to use the properties like housing, community centers, etc.

Sam has the support of community organizations including Faith In Action and OEA, the local teachers’ union. Although he believes that charter schools have a negative impact on public schools, he believes in a stick and carrot strategy to bring charter parents into the fold of public schools. He needs support in learning the connections between development and gentrification of our city with privatization of our public schools and imagining what public land for public good looks like.

1. Cherisse Gash

Cherisse is an Oakland parent and grew up in District 3 and has deep ties to the community. She has a strong vision and track record of leadership mobilizing parents around school closures. She understands how the privatization of schools has fueled racial injustice and pushed out Black and Brown families. She is deeply committed to keeping police out of Oakland schools, stemming the tide of charter school expansion in the district, and creating complete transparency with the school district’s budget to stop school closures.


2. VanCedric Williams

VanCedric has a long history of teaching and organizing in the Bay Area and is committed to budget transparency and racial justice in Oakland schools. He plans to re-establish trust between parents, teachers, and OUSD, strengthen literacy standards, incorporate ethnic studies into K-12, and build budget accountability mechanisms into the district’s budget process. 

It’s true that VanCedric has less experience with Oakland schools than San Francisco’s. But VanCedric’s record shows that he is a leader who knows how to get things done. He has been an active member of unions and advocacy groups including United Educators of San Francisco (UESF), California Federation of Certificated and Classified Teachers (CFT), and the CFT’s Diversity Leadership Committee and Racial Justice Taskforce. If Cherisse and VanCedric win, we could have a progressive majority on the School Board.

Cherisse and VanCedric’s main opponent, Maiya Edgerly, has money coming in from the charters. We need leaders who are committed to the public school system, not corporate privatization. Ranked choice vote for Cherisse and VanCedric.

Mike is an educator and organizer who has a strong commitment to the school district and a clear vision for addressing the district’s most pressing challenges. Mike believes, and so do we, that our city needs to stop the privatization of our public schools and remove the harmful presence of police officers in the place where our children are learning and growing.

Mike’s platform includes putting a stop to school closures, a full audit of OUSD, and stopping the spread of charter schools throughout the city. Mike’s been endorsed by other leaders that we believe in – like Cat Brooks and Carroll Fife – and none of his opponents have as strong a sustained commitment to our city.

1. Kristina Molina

Kristina is a dedicated parent leader and advocate who has won improvements for Oakland schools and will do more if elected. Kristina is a parent of four children in Oakland public schools and an active member of Parent Voice Oakland. 

For over 20 years, she has worked to improve the lives of communities of color, women, elders, youth, immigrants, unsheltered, and LGBTQ+ individuals. For example, Kristina created caucuses with community members to reflect the diversity of District 7 and its needs, including a Black caucus, Latinx caucus, parents with special needs in schools, LGBTQ+ caucus, and more. 

If elected, Kristina would focus on ensuring clear accountability around the OUSD budget, beginning with an audit. In our opinion, no other candidates compare in terms of values, commitment, and track record. Vote for Kristina.

 

2. Victor Valerio

Victor is a proponent of public schools, and he believes we can make public schools more enticing to families by making them better.

Victor grew up in OUSD and has experience with OUSD Budget Oversight, and while we think some of his policy proposals could be stronger, we are impressed with his platform to improve public schools in Oakland, which includes closing the gap on inequity by supporting the most marginalized and at-risk youth, avoiding further school closures in East Oakland, and addressing the digital divide in Oakland schools.

BART Board of Directors

Lateefah Simon is a nationally recognized advocate for civil and racial justice. She is also a single mother who relies on public transit each day and intimately understands the experiences of BART passengers. 

As the current president of the BART board of directors, Lateefah has been unwavering in her values to make BART accessible, affordable, accountable, and functional for working families. Her leadership has been crucial to the transit agency’s shift towards policies promoting racial justice and inclusion. She has led a variety of successful efforts, including discounts for low-income fairs and an ambassador program to increase the number of unarmed uniformed personnel on trains to help passengers stay safe. 

Lateefah is the type of bold, inspiring, and creative leader who can ensure our transit system is accessible, safe, and gets people where they need to go. Her impressive track record as the executive director of multiple large nonprofit organizations, as well as her accolades which include being the youngest woman to receive a MacArthur Genius Award, are testaments to Lateefah’s steadfast leadership. By contrast, her police-union backed opponent in the BART race does not share her visionary commitment to public safety or her skillful leadership. A vote for Lateefah is a vote for transit justice.

Lateefah Simon is a nationally recognized advocate for civil and racial justice. She is also a single mother who relies on public transit each day and intimately understands the experiences of BART passengers. 

As the current president of the BART board of directors, Lateefah has been unwavering in her values to make BART accessible, affordable, accountable, and functional for working families. Her leadership has been crucial to the transit agency’s shift towards policies promoting racial justice and inclusion. She has led a variety of successful efforts, including discounts for low-income fairs and an ambassador program to increase the number of unarmed uniformed personnel on trains to help passengers stay safe. 

Lateefah is the type of bold, inspiring, and creative leader who can ensure our transit system is accessible, safe, and gets people where they need to go. Her impressive track record as the executive director of multiple large nonprofit organizations, as well as her accolades which include being the youngest woman to receive a MacArthur Genius Award, are testaments to Lateefah’s steadfast leadership. By contrast, her police-union backed opponents in the BART race do not share her visionary commitment to public safety or her skillful leadership. A vote for Lateefah is a vote for transit justice.

Oakland Ballot Measures

In a year where young people fought and won to make their schools safer by eliminating police in schools, youth are leading all over Oakland. Our young people are the most affected by the decisions of the school board, and they should have a say in who represents them. This measure allows persons aged 16 and 17, who would otherwise be eligible to vote under state law, to vote for school board.

Allow 16- and 17-Year-Olds to Vote for School Board

To fight illegal dumping, the city can currently only levy a $1,000 dollar fine--an amount put in place in 1968. This measure would allow the city council to raise fine limits for specific municipal code violations, like dumping, to over $1,000, and put more tools in the toolbox to stop dumping in our neighborhoods.

The Council would have to set a new cap after a public hearing.

Any ordinances that have specific fine limits would still be in force. For example, if a law says that the first violation is $250 and subsequent violations are no more than $500, that would still be the limit regardless of what the overall cap is in the law.

The purpose of RR is to give the city an effective tool to enforce our code--especially against egregious offenders. For example, repeat illegal dumpers or businesses who repeatedly ignore the municipal code requirements could be subject to larger fines, which we hope will deter the problematic behavior. Currently, businesses often just pay the fines as the cost of doing business because the fines are so modest.

Remove $1000 Limit on Fines for Code Violations

As the Oakland Police Commission--a task force that the community won--gets ready to cut Oakland's policing budget by 50% next year and redirect funds to community services like jobs, health, and housing, this measure would move other important accountability measures like the office of inspector general outside of the police department. The inspector general would then be able to independently review Oakland Police Department practices.

This measure would also allow the Police Commission to hire attorneys.

Policing has proven that it can't hold itself accountable; voting yes on this measure will give us a better chance of doing so and keeping all our communities safe, no matter what we look like or what neighborhood we live in.

Strengthen Police Commission

Alameda County Ballot Measures

Extends an existing tax on utility users in unincorporated areas for 13 years. Power companies should be paying these taxes, but contuining this tax is an important revenue source for the county.

Continue Pitching in on Utilities in Unincorporated Areas

Establishes a half-cent sales tax to raise $150 million per year for 10 years for general public services.

Although this is a regressive sales tax for general fund purposes and puts the onus on low-income people, not on corporations where it should be, we need to protect essential services like health care, housing, and good public jobs at the local level that serve the most vulnerable people in our county--especially in a time of downturn.

St. Mary’s Center, a leading community center and service provider for elders, young children, and unhoused people, is championing this measure.

We hope you will vote yes on Measure W and follow up to help ensure that funds will go where they are intended.

It is possible to fully and reliably fund our cities, our emergency and safety-net services, and the world where all our communities can
thrive. However, instead these resources are lining the pockets of millionaires, billionaires, and big corporations. That’s why we support fair, equitable taxes--for budgets that ensure our children will inherit quality public education and public goods, no matter what they look like or where they come from. Ultimately, we urge you to support California's Proposition 15, which will reclaim $12 billion per year for schools and local community services from the wealthiest corporations.

Fund Mental Health, Housing, and Job Training

In the midst of increased climate crisis fires and reduced budgets, adding resources for the fire department is a good idea. This is a $90 million bond benefiting the Alameda County fire department, backed by the county board of supervisors.

Borrow Funds to Fund County Fire Department

Public education is on the ballot- with cratering public budgets and costs associated with distance learning and preparation for safe in person instruction, school funding has never been more essential. Passing this measure will invest in students and the whole community. This measure issues $735 million dollars in bonds for classroom repair, electrical systems, plumbing and sewers.

Borrow Funds to Repair and Upgrade School Buildings

California Propositions

Proposition 14 is a $5.5 billion bond, and ultimately the money for it would come from the state's general fund. This funding would allow the continuation of stem cell research for treatments of a wide variety of conditions. Funding from the 2004 Proposition 71 brought many world class scientists to California to research treatments and cures for conditions including cancer, infectious diseases, and Alzheimer's. This proposition also includes a Treatment and Cures Accessibility and Affordability Working Group, which creates policies to address affordability concerns of cures found through this research.

Increase Bond Funding for Stem Cell Research

No matter what we look like or where we come from most of us pitch in for each other and hope to leave things better off for those to come.

But today a handful of corporations undermine all of us. Corporations like Chevron, Google and Disney rake in record profits, while they refuse to contribute to the schools where our young people learn, the roads we drive on, the buses we take to work. Then they divide us against each other by blaming black and brown people for our problems, hoping we won’t notice so they can continue to reap the benefits of our contributions while refusing to put in their share.

Because the wealthiest corporations in California refuse to contribute to the schools where our young people learn, they have dragged California schools down to the bottom 10 in the country when it comes to per-pupil spending. When we vote in Schools and Communities First, we will restore $12 billion annually in shared resources for our schools and colleges so we can have smaller classroom sizes, better teacher pay, and more shared resources for our schools.

That’s why we’re supporting the Schools and Communities First initiative (Prop 15). When we vote it in, we will restore the resources we need for our communities by ensuring that everyone pitches in for each other in California, including the wealthiest corporations.

This is the first measure that would bring in shared resources of this scale to ever qualify for the ballot.

When everyone pitches in, we make California a place we’re proud to call home with the world-class schools and universities, healthcare, homes, and shared resources our families need. When we join together across neighborhoods to unrig the rules, we’ll restore the resources to truly educate all of our kids and truly support all of our families.

Note: The opposition wants you to think that this will hurt small businesses and homeowners, but the truth is that this affects only the largest, wealthiest corporations like Chevron and ensures they pay their fair share.

Put Schools and Communities First

Proposition 16 affirms that race, gender, and ethnicity can be considered in hiring and admissions processes, and overturns the racist Proposition 209 which banned affirmative action in state institutions. (Propostion 209 was passed nearly 25 years ago in 1996.) Affirmative action accounts for systemic and systematic barriers for entry into workplaces and schools. Race, ethnicity, and gender consciousness in admissions and hiring processes promotes equality and diverse learning and work spaces.

End the Ban on Affirmative Action

Bay Rising firmly supports the right to vote, and this proposition would restore the right to vote to Californians who are currently on parole. There are about 50,000 people on parole in California who would regain the right to vote with this proposition. Currently, people must complete their parole sentences before they are eligible to vote.

Free the Vote for People on Parole

Allows 17-year-olds to vote in primary elections if they will have turned 18 by the general election. Prop 18 also allows for 17-year-olds to vote in special elections should they turn 18 by the next general election.

Allow 17-Year-Olds to Vote in Primary Elections

Lets wealthy homeowners who buy a more expensive house pay lower property taxes, while disadvantaging younger or first-time homebuyers. Cuts into the public money we need for schools, health clinics, and more.

Prevent Deeper Housing Inequality

Vote no to protect the progress we've made to undo mass incarceration. This measure reverses the progress made in moving funding towards education and prevention and away from incarceration. It increases the number of people locked up in prisons.

Specifically, this proposition reclassifies repeated theft as a felony, enables tougher penalties for those violating parole multiple times, and limits early parole.

Protect Progress We’ve Made to Undo Mass Incarceration

Current law stops local goverments from using more progressive rent control measures--this allows cities to implement rent control for residential properties over 15 years old.

This proposition is set to replace the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act.

Allow Local Communities to Expand Rent Control

Uber, Lyft, and other tech giants want to re-classify their employees as "independent contractors" to avoid labor protections such as minimum wage, and they're spending over $100 million to do it. Vote no to protect gig workers and make sure drivers get a fair share.

This proposition by the tech giants would distinguish app-based gig employers from other California employers. Although it would institute certain benefits, it would create an exemption from standard work and wage restrictions for these companies. With this proposition, gig workers would lose state-mandated protections for employees, such as minimum wage, overtime, unemployment insurance, and workers’ compensation.

Protect Gig Workers and Make Sure Drivers Get a Fair Share

Requires dialysis clinics to have licensed physicians on site and report infection data to public health officials.

Regulate Kidney Dialysis Clinics for Safety

Rewrites the Consumer Privacy Act, exempts some of the largest tech corporations from oversight, and adds burdens to people who want to protect their personal information from being sold. Vote no to protect your data from tech corporations.

Consumer groups have found many problems in the fine print of this measure, such as allowing tech companies to ignore a universal "do not sell my information" electronic signal and making consumers notify every vendor individually.

Protect Your Data from Tech Corporations

Cash bail, a horrific system that keeps people in jail only because they are poor and keeps many Black and brown people locked up, needs to end. However, this initiative puts forward a solution that would replace the cash bail system with one that applies a "risk assessment," an algorithm that attempts to forecast whether someone is likely to end up back in jail and which is likely to reinforce the racial disparities in our jails. The "risk assessment" also puts more power in judges' hands to keep people locked up away from their families while awaiting trial. Bay Rising Action has allies and partners on both sides of this issue: those who think that ending cash bail is the highest priority, and those who think the new system will have damaging consequences that will be harder to undo. 

Switch Cash Bail with System Based on “Public Safety Risk”

Voter Registration & Absentee Ballots

Given the pandemic and the threats to our democracy with Trump’s cuts to the post office, we urge you to vote early by October 15th. All registered voters will be sent an absentee ballot automatically to limit COVID exposure. You must register to vote to receive an absentee ballot! You can vote in person or drop off your ballot at the Alameda County Registrar of Voters 1225 Fallon Street, Room G1, Oakland, or put it into one of the official, free 24-hour drop boxes anytime by November 3rd 8pm. If you use a USPS mailbox, postage is free, and it’s critical to vote early!

Key Dates: Ensure You Are Registered to Vote

Vote EARLY Before Nov. 3rd Election Day

  • Given the potential for delays in counting ballots, WE RECOMMEND VOTING BY OCTOBER 15TH!
  • Vote in person or drop off your ballot at the Alameda County Registrar of Voters: 1225 Fallon Street, Room G1, Oakland  before Nov. 3rd BY 8PM
  • Place your ballot into a free 24-hour drop box (not a USPS mailbox) before Nov. 3rd BY 8PM
  • On November 3rd, you can vote in person or drop your ballot off at your polling place BY 8PM
  • If you send via USPS, vote as early as possible before November 3rd, and postage is free.

Paid for by Oakland Rising Committee, sponsored by Movement Strategy Center Action Fund.  
Committee major funding from:  See Forward Fund, East Bay Community Foundation, Quinn Delaney. 
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee.