Critical Election in a Crisis

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Alameda County Endorsements

ABOUT AC ENDORSEMENTS

Mike is an educator and organizer who has a strong commitment to the school district and a clear vision for addressing the district’s most pressing challenges. Mike believes, and so do we, that our city needs to stop the privatization of our public schools and remove the harmful presence of police officers in the place where our children are learning and growing.


Mike’s platform includes putting a stop to school closures, a full audit of OUSD, and stopping the spread of charter schools throughout the city. Mike’s been endorsed by other leaders that we believe in – like Cat Brooks and Carroll Fife – and none of his opponents have as strong a sustained commitment to our city.

1. Cherisse Gash

Cherisse is an Oakland parent and grew up in District 3 and has deep ties to the community. She has a strong vision and track record of leadership mobilizing parents around school closures. She understands how the privatization of schools has fueled racial injustice and pushed out Black and Brown families. She is deeply committed to keeping police out of Oakland schools, stemming the tide of charter school expansion in the district, and creating complete transparency with the school district’s budget to stop school closures.

 
2. VanCedric Williams

VanCedric has a long history of teaching and organizing in the Bay Area and is committed to budget transparency and racial justice in Oakland schools. He plans to re-establish trust between parents, teachers, and OUSD, strengthen literacy standards, incorporate ethnic studies into K-12, and build budget accountability mechanisms into the district’s budget process.

 

It’s true that VanCedric has less experience with Oakland schools than San Francisco’s. But VanCedric’s record shows that he is a leader who knows how to get things done. He has been an active member of unions and advocacy groups including United Educators of San Francisco (UESF), California Federation of Certificated and Classified Teachers (CFT), and the CFT’s Diversity Leadership Committee and Racial Justice Taskforce. If Cherisse and VanCedric win, we could have a progressive majority on the School Board.

 

Cherisse and VanCedric’s main opponent, Maiya Edgerly, has money coming in from the charters. We need leaders who are committed to the public school system, not corporate privatization. Ranked choice vote for Cherisse and VanCedric.

There really is no big difference between the two candidates. They both support budget accountability, and oppose school closures, publicly-owned property sales, and charter school expansion. 

Stacy is a little more adamant about abolishing the presence of police in schools. She believes that there is no real place for police in schools; while Sam sees that there could be some need for emergency police support but believes there should be no ongoing police presence.

They both need a little more support on seeing the impact of privatization beyond the school system, its connection to gentrification, and how to address the impacts of gentrification within the schools.

Stacy is a bookkeeper by trade and wants to focus on how to use the budget as a moral compass and, after an audit, how to clearly address these priorities by focusing funding to school sites. She needs support navigating Board politics and using a community engagement model that includes organizing families. She believes that the sale of publicly-owned properties should be barred and that we should consider innovative ways to use the properties like housing, community centers, etc.

Sam has the support of community organizations including Faith In Action and OEA, the local teachers’ union. Although he believes that charter schools have a negative impact on public schools, he believes in a stick and carrot strategy to bring charter parents into the fold of public schools. He needs support in learning the connections between development and gentrification of our city with privatization of our public schools and imagining what public land for public good looks like.

Oakland City County Endorsements

ABOUT CC ENDORSEMENTS

Oakland City Council sets goals and priorities for the City. The council approves the City budget, adopts ordinances to help the City serve its community members, and appoints members to various boards and commissions.

Oakland Rising Action is enthusiastic to announce our endorsement for the re-election of Nikki Fortunato Bas for the Oakland City Council in District 2. Nikki brings the expertise and experience to tackle the tough challenges that face Oakland. Nikki’s vision of bold, progressive leadership that creates an Oakland for everyone is aligned with Oakland Rising Action’s values. For over two decades, Nikki has been an advocate for working people, leading the passage of policies in Oakland to create the building blocks for regional, state, and national change. We believe that in this time of unprecedented housing and homelessness crisis, we deserve leaders who will courageously stand by their values and by the people of Oakland in addressing the most critical issues in Oakland. We deserve leaders who will provide efficient response to both constituent concerns and the larger systemic problems like homelessness and affordable housing – and Nikki brings a proven track record of doing so.

Rebecca Kaplan is a proven advocate for racial and economic justice, and has shown considerable growth as a council member for the past eleven years. Her wide array of initiatives to improve quality of life, jobs, and safety throughout the city speak to her values of equity and justice. Rebecca has an impressive track record of progressive policy wins in Oakland, such as:

  • Fighting for the strongest and most independent police oversight commission possible.
  • Authoring Measure JJ, which voters passed in 2016 to protect renters from excessive rent increases and wrongful evictions.
  • Improving air quality for local communities by representing Oakland on the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Board and obtaining millions of dollars for vital Oakland projects
  • Protecting publicly-owned land for the public good.

Rebecca’s opponent, Derrek Johnson, could not be further from Rebecca’s values-driven approach. Johnson has opposed commonsense policies such as paid sick days for Oakland workers. He has received substantial donations from big business interests, including real estate developers who have been driving Oakland’s affordable housing crisis. A vote for Johnson is a vote for profits over people.

In the wake of a pandemic and climate disaster, we cannot afford to lose Rebecca’s leadership. She is the candidate who is open to accountability, sticks with the community and puts working families first. Let’s vote for a leader who we can trust.

Richard is a real values-driven leader. Bringing a fresh perspective, he partners with the community to create systemic solutions to Oakland’s challenges. We are excited to see his innovative vision for the city, which includes commitment to:

  • Participatory budgeting so the people get a say in the city budget
  • The Black New Deal to reinvigorate the local economy while promoting racial justice
  • Defunding police and reinvesting in community, education, and job-training services
  • Empowering Oakland teachers through just wages and investing in public schools
  • Developing a cultural corridor to highlight Oakland’s vibrant cultural history

Richard has a track record of working with local community organizations dedicated to improving the lives of working families such as Communities United for Restorative Youth justice (CURYJ), the Sunshine Movement, and Centro Legal de la Raza.

Meanwhile, Richard’s opponent and current seat holder, Noel Gallo, has proven himself to be weak when it comes to responding to making systemic changes.  Gallo is full of contradictions – he often sides with renter protections, but has referred to unhoused residents in his district as being filthy and drug users. He doesn’t see the connection between shifting city resources away from policing and toward increased services and programs in his district.

We need a councilmember who will stay true to the progressive values of this city. Vote for Richard.

Oakland Unified School Board Endorsements

Dan is a steadfast leader who has proven his commitment to environmental stewardship, affordable housing for all, and evidence-based policymaking throughout his tenure as councilmember. Dan has led key initiatives for working families in Oakland, including:

  • Banning the storage and moving of coal through the Port of Oakland
  • Developing the Tenant Protection Ordinance of 2014
  • Authoring the charter ballot measure to create the Civilian Police Commission
  • Securing millions of dollars for affordable housing

Dan has worked successfully with a range of community groups including East Bay Housing Organization, the Union of Concerned Scientists, and Environmental Climate Action Plan. As the effects of climate change are making our lives more challenging, the need for clean energy becomes more urgent. Oaklanders need Dan’s track record, networks, and scientific approach to help Oakland stay resilient and healthy. 

Dan’s opponents for the District 1 seat do not have the leadership experience or commitment to the community or the environment that he has. Dan is widely recognized for being one of the most effective policymakers in Oakland, and we look forward to seeing his vision of resolving the housing crisis, protecting the environment, and strengthening our public schools happen. Because when Dan commits to something, he gets it done.

Oakland City Council sets goals and priorities for the City. The council approves the City budget, adopts ordinances to help the City serve its community members, and appoints members to various boards and commissions.

Oakland Rising Action is enthusiastic to announce our endorsement for the re-election of Nikki Fortunato Bas for the Oakland City Council in District 2. Nikki brings the expertise and experience to tackle the tough challenges that face Oakland. Nikki’s vision of bold, progressive leadership that creates an Oakland for everyone is aligned with Oakland Rising Action’s values. For over two decades, Nikki has been an advocate for working people, leading the passage of policies in Oakland to create the building blocks for regional, state, and national change. We believe that in this time of unprecedented housing and homelessness crisis, we deserve leaders who will courageously stand by their values and by the people of Oakland in addressing the most critical issues in Oakland. We deserve leaders who will provide efficient response to both constituent concerns and the larger systemic problems like homelessness and affordable housing – and Nikki brings a proven track record of doing so.

Richard is a real values-driven leader. Bringing a fresh perspective, he partners with the community to create systemic solutions to Oakland’s challenges. We are excited to see his innovative vision for the city, which includes commitment to:

  • Participatory budgeting so the people get a say in the city budget
  • The Black New Deal to reinvigorate the local economy while promoting racial justice
  • Defunding police and reinvesting in community, education, and job-training services
  • Empowering Oakland teachers through just wages and investing in public schools
  • Developing a cultural corridor to highlight Oakland’s vibrant cultural history

Richard has a track record of working with local community organizations dedicated to improving the lives of working families such as Communities United for Restorative Youth justice (CURYJ), the Sunshine Movement, and Centro Legal de la Raza.

Meanwhile, Richard’s opponent and current seat holder, Noel Gallo, has proven himself to be weak when it comes to responding to making systemic changes.  Gallo is full of contradictions – he often sides with renter protections, but has referred to unhoused residents in his district as being filthy and drug users. He doesn’t see the connection between shifting city resources away from policing and toward increased services and programs in his district.

We need a councilmember who will stay true to the progressive values of this city. Vote for Richard.

Oakland Ballot Measures

Renewal of Measure N - Link Learning parcel tax with no increase that support our high school College and Career for All program. Measure N is set to expire in 2024.

Renewed parcel tax for college and career readiness program.

Authorizes the City of Oakland to develop, construct or acquire 13,000 low rent residential units in social housing projects in the city for the purpose of providing affordable rental housing to low-income households and individuals.

Authorizes Oakand to create social housing for 13,000 households.

Amends the City Charter to replace all gendered langauge including pronouns with gender neutral langauge

Update City Charter with gender neutral language.

Authorizes the City to be open the possiblity for the future ability to create a system that allows non-citizens to vote

Opens door to non-citizen voting in Oakland.

The Invest in Our Oakland Act will provide relief for residents and local business owners who have been heavily impacted by the pandemic. By creating an equitable tax rate and modernizing Oakland’s business structure, we can reduce taxes for small and medium sized businesses while making large wealthy corporations pay their fair share of taxes that reflects their large gross profits. It is expected to generate over $20 million every year for Oakland’s general fund that we can use to address years of lack of investment in housing, high quality jobs, education, public safety, road and sidewalk maintenance and bike lanes.

Reduces taxes for small businesses and generates over $20M for Oakland’s general fund.

This bond measure allocates $850M to the following:
- $350M to acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of interim and permanent affordable and social housing
- $290M to transporation projects such as street paving, curb ramps and sidewalks
- $210M to Citywide facility Preservation and improvement projects such as libraries, head start, recreation and senior centers consistent with City's Equitable Climate Action Plan
- $45M - Parks & Open Spaces
- $40M - Fire Facilities
- $30M - Police Facilities
- $15M - Library Faciltiies
- $80M - other city facilities

Allocates $850M via a bond towards affordable housing and infrastructure improvement projects.

Amends Measure EE and Measure Y
- prevent evictions of households with children and educators during a school year
- Extend eviction protections to those living in RVs
- changes the exemption to the first ten years after a new rental building is built (changes this from the current 1994 year)

Extends eviction and Just Cause protections for tenants.

The Fair Elections Oakland Act will give Oaklanders the opportunity to elect local candidates that prioritize the real needs of our communities. It will create a process of transparency that allows us to hold our elected officials and government accountable to us and help us build an equitable democracy that truly works for all of us. It’s time our representatives rep us.

Creates more accountable elected officials by limiting the influence of big money.

Makes some Charter amendments that will provide Term Limits for CC, Require min 2 hearings at City Council for BMs, Count CMs absents and abstentions as "No" vote and gives more opportunity for Mayor to break the tie votes, change so PEC determins salaries of City Auditor and City Attorney, clarifies duties of City Auditor

Creates terms limits for City Councilmembers.

20 Year Parcel Tax for Oakland Zoo improvements = a tax fund would be set up to ensure fire safety at the zoo, where some infrastructure is 60 years old, maintain its veterinary hospital, and expand affordable education programs for school children, among other improvements.

20 Year Parcel Tax for Oakland Zoo improvements.

California Propositions

Amends the State Constitution to affirm reproductive freedom. This measure affirms that the state shall not deny or interfere with an individual's reproductive freedom in their most intimate decisions, which includes their fundamental right to choose to have an abortion, their fundamental right to choose or refuse contraceptives, their fundamental right to privacy guaranteed by Section 1, and the constitutional right to not be denied equal protection guaranteed by Section 7.

Safeguards freedom to make decisions about our bodies and health.

Allows federally recognized Native American tribes to operate roulette, dice games, and sports wagering on tribal lands. Imposes a 10% tax on sports-wagering profits and revenue would go towards problem-gambling programs.

Expands types of gaming at tribal casinos and allows sports betting.

Legalizes online and mobile sports wagering, which currently is prohibited, for persons 21 years and older. Such wagering may be offered only by federally recognized Indian tribes and eligible businesses that contract with them. Individuals placing bets must be in California and not located on Indian lands. Imposes 10% tax on sports-wagering revenues and licensing fees. Directs tax and licensing revenues first to regulatory costs, then remainder to: 85% to homelessness programs; 15% to nonparticipating tribes.

Allows adults to bet on sports events online outside of tribal land.

Provides additional funding for arts and music education in all K-12 public schools (including charter schools) by annually allocating from the state General Fund an amount equaling 1% of required state and local funding for public schools. Allocates a greater proportion of the funds to schools serving more economically disadvantaged students.

Increases annual funding for arts and music in K-12 public schools.

Requires physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant, with six months’ relevant experience, on site during treatment at outpatient kidney dialysis clinics; authorizes exemption for staffing shortage if qualified medical professional is available through telehealth. Requires clinics to disclose to patients all physicians with clinic ownership interests of five percent or more. Requires clinics to report dialysis-related infection data to the state. Prohibits clinics from closing or substantially reducing services without state approval. Prohibits clinics from refusing to treat patients based on source of payment.

Requires experienced medical staff at dialysis clinics.

Increases tax on personal income over $2 million by 1.75% for individuals and married couples and allocates new tax revenues as follows: (1) 45% for rebates and other incentives for zero-emission vehicle purchases and 35% for charging stations for zero-emission vehicles, with at least half of this funding directed to low-income households and communities; and (2) 20% for wildfire prevention and suppression programs, with priority given to hiring and training firefighters. Lyft is willing to bankroll this measure. They are organizing a labor/ community coalition and want CA CALLS to be part of it. Some EJ groups like CCAEJ and East Yard have supported the measure.

Increases income tax on those earning $2M+ to fund incentivizes for zero-emission vehicles.

Referendum challenging a 2020 law on the next statewide ballot after the November 3, 2020 general election. The challenged law prohibits the retail sale of certain flavored tobacco products and tobacco flavor enhancers.

Big Tobacco’s challenge to law prohibiting sale of most flavored tobacco products.

Voter Information

Given the pandemic and the threats to our democracy with Trump’s cuts to the post office, we urge you to vote early by October 15th. All registered voters will be sent an absentee ballot automatically to limit COVID exposure. You must register to vote to receive an absentee ballot! You can vote in person or drop off your ballot at the Alameda County Registrar of Voters 1225 Fallon Street, Room G1, Oakland, or put it into one of the official, free 24-hour drop boxes anytime by November 3rd 8pm. If you use a USPS mailbox, postage is free, and it’s critical to vote early!

Paid for by Oakland Rising Committee, sponsored by Center for Empowered Politics.